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There was a smaller than usual turnout in February as some members were busy with mid-term holidays and others were taking Mary Hickmott‘s embroidery class on paisley designs, organized by the Kenya Embroiderers’ Guild. Chairwoman Patty Arensen chaired the meeting and started by welcoming visitors and new members. Members were happy to welcome back Indu Shah after a long absence necessitated by her husband’s health problems, and Surinder Thethy, recently returned from three years in the UK.

All members were asked to fill in forms to update contact details and to offer their individual skills to help the Guild committee with their expertise.

Sponsorship forms for the Exhibition were distributed with a request for everyone to make an effort to bring in sponsorship money as the fee for the hall hire has risen steeply this year. The minimum donation for sponsors to be acknowledged on our posters etc is K Sh 5,000/-

At the March meeting a member of staff from FreMo, Kawangare, to whom we have recently made donations, will tell us about their work. Sheryl Fowler will show a quilting video.

The April meeting is the KQG AGM. Members are requested to be present to elect a new committee for the coming year. Patty requested nominations for two places on the Executive Committee. Please check with Patty or other Committee members if you are interested in serving. There will also be a presentation on Art Quilts.

On March 16th, Gretchen Saunders will be holding a fun class on Crazy Quilting at the Sikh Union. This will be a full day class for 1,500/- and the proceeds will be donated to charity. There are a few places left. Contact Gretchen for further details or send a message to the KQG Gmail address.

In April there will either be a fabric dyeing class held at Amani ya Juu, off Riverside Drive, or Patty will hold a class at her home on transferring photos onto quilts. More news on these later.

Members were requested to return unsold calendars, and sales money received for those they sold, to the Guild committee, so that accounts can be finalized. It is proposed that a calendar will be designed for 2017 using photos from the recent elephant quilt challenge, together with elephant note cards. These are to be ready for sale at the exhibition.

Re the exhibition, KEG have agreed to join KQG on a one third basis and they will have one third of the hall for their exhibits. It has been agreed that KQG will have no final judging, There will be two awards – Vistors’ Choice and Guild Choice (each Guild member having one vote only).

The Workshop is scheduled to open at Sheryl’s house on Lower Kabete Road on March 3rd and will be open every Thursday morning, apart from the 3rd Thursday of the month, following the opening.

Gretchen demonstrated the next stage of the Mystery Quilt in Sheryl’s absence.

The PanAfrican Friendship Quilt Challenge is underway and the quilts will shortly leave for South Africa.

We had a good selection of quilts for Show and Tell, including colourful kanga quilts from Carol Davey and a quilt made for her son’s wedding by Patty, with her own dress fabric from her wedding outfit used on the back. The door prize was won by Jasvinder Phull.

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After the coffee break we were glad to welcome Dena Crain, down from Baringo to give us a most interesting talk on Kawandi quilts from India. These distinctive quilts are made by the Siddi people, descended from Africans, who were transported to India by the Portuguese and other nations over the last four hundred years. Their quilts were brought to the attention of the art and quilting world by Professor Henry Drewal, from the Department of Art History at University of Wisconsin, Madison. He describes the making of a Kawandi quilt below:

“The quilters start at one of the corners of the sari and work their way around it, usually in a counterclockwise direction,” he says. “They fix patches made from the family’s old clothing to the sari with a running back stitch that eventually covers the entire quilt, both patchwork top and sari bottom. Some quilters create small, close-spaced stitches, others spread them further apart. The stitches exhibit a distinctive rhythm that is part of the individual quilter’s visual signature.”

All That Jazz

All That Jazz by Dena Dale Crain

Inspired by the Siddi quilts, Dena has devised her own version, of this technique, worked by machine, which she has called Quilt-As-You-Sew. Dena explained the technique as patchwork with no piecing, and showed us several beautiful samples of her quilts made in this way. She challenged members to try the method and to teach it to others in Kenya – in other words to bring the technique back to Africa.

A 2011 exhibition of Kawandi quilts can be seen at Museum of the African Diaspora.


There was a sizeable turnout at the January meeting.  We had three new members register and a few visitors were present. Chairperson Patty Arensen welcomed members back from the long holiday and wished everyone a Happy New Year.

Patty reminded everyone that subscriptions are due to be paid.  There is a questionnaire  for members to complete so the Committee can get a ‘feel’ for matching interests, skills and talents with needs for help this year.

It is important that we have up-to-date information on members so the address book can be current and everyone receives monthly Snippets.  We had some complaints that emails are not getting through; however, we had a lot of bounces from email, too.  This happens when members fail to notify Jharna of email address changes. Please make sure we have your current email address; thanks!

To make our meetings more sociable, we would like members to sign up to bring plates.  At present only a few members bring food for the coffee break.  We need volunteers to run audio/visual equipment. Members are encouraged to write articles about their quilting experiences for Snippets.

The Kenya Quilt Guild has a big year coming up with our patchwork quilt exhibition scheduled for the first weekend in October. We need as many quilts as possible.  The raffle quilts are underway. The Exhibition takes place 7th-8th-9th October; quilt hanging is on the Thursday beforehand.

The first Exhibition Committee meets soon after our January monthly meeting.  Again, we call on members to hang the quilts and to work during the show.

Sarah Brewin brings with her this year a group of quilting visitors. They are interested in taking classes.  The hall may be shared with the Kenya Embroiderers’ Guild, 1/3 KEG and 2/3 KQG; this is yet to be confirmed.

We have had no reply from Daphne Sheldrick about the donation of the Challenge Quilts, but we have another contact to try.

We will print raffle tickets when we receive permission from the Kenya Betting Control and Licensing Board.  Members receive two books each; each book contains 10 tickets @ Shs. 100.00 each.  It is important for these tickets to be sold as the raffle is the main fundraiser to assist in paying for rental of the hall.

Eight KQG members are participating in the PanAfrican Friendship Quilt project.  Each member received 5 fat quarters and they were to add another 5 fabrics to construct the beginnings of a wall-hanging.  Once done the piece is to be sent to their ‘twin’ in another African country and their ‘twin’ will send theirs to the KQG member.  Each in turn adds their bit and returns the quilt to the original quilter.

These quilts will be exhibited in South Africa just one week before our exhibition in October.  If anyone knows someone flying from S.A. to Kenya on Wednesday 5th October or Thursday 6th October who would be willing to bring the wall-hangings, we would appreciate the contact information on this person.  We will pay for the extra piece of luggage.  This will be a wonderful addition to our own exhibition.  Please contact either Gretchen or Patty.

We intend to sell quilt kits at the exhibition.  Once the patterns are made and the supplies organised, we need volunteers to come to the workshop on Thursday mornings to help cut them out and package them.

Patty Arensen’s 2015 projects for church wall-hangings have been completed. However, the work has worn out the presser foot on her machine.  Rohini Desai undertook to secure the part and repair her machine.  She is a trained, certified Bernina repair person and her work is reasonably priced. She also tutored Patty on the use of her machine. Use the contact form in the sidebar to ask us to put you in touch with Rohini.

We move forward with education and hope to have many classes and workshops this year. The next class scheduled is Gretchen Mwaura’s offering on Crazy Quilts on 16th March.  Spaces are limited to 15, so please sign up as soon as possible.  The charge is only Shs. 1500.00 for the full day, proceeds to be donated to charity.  Full payment must be made by the February meeting.  Patty will teach her photo transfer to raw edge appliqué class, too, but she can take only a few students.  Please contact her for more information.

Library discards were for sale at the meeting.  It costs only KES 100 to check out a book for a month.  Patty recommends ‘Art Quilts,’ which is a new book.

Most of the Kenya Quilt Guild 2016 calendars sold, but there are some members who have not either returned unsold calendars or brought in money for calendar sales.  It is quite important that we close the books on these calendars, so please return or pay for calendars immediately; thanks!

The Mystery Quilt is in full swing.  Sheryl Fowler had the instructions and the samples for the January edition.  There are some members who are in the process of making the quilts. These quilts will be displayed at the exhibition.

The Guild has made a donation of KES 20,000 to Freemo, a maternity hospital in Kenya.  They need more baby supplies and clothing.

Show and Tell:  Elizabeth Cheserem had finished her Elephant Challenge. Brij Datta made a baby applique quilt.  Gretchen Sanders Mwaura also finished her Challenge using Crazy Quilt techniques. She also had another small quilt that incorporated transparent windows filled with colourful beads.  Suzanne Waithaka had handbags, patchwork and quilted.  Lois had a table runner that was pieced and machine quilted, along with an iPad case.  Jasvinder Phull made a teddy bear baby quilt.  Raghbir made a child’s quilt with cars.  Tina Fataure hand-painted and quilted a wall-hanging.  Lakhbir Virdee showed her colourful alphabet quilt and Gill had a variety of African fabric bags that Pat had made.  Bindi won the door prize after coffee.

The program this month was “Sashing Ideas” by Gill Rebelo.  Gill showed members and visitors how to piece together blocks with plain strips of sashing. She demonstrated simple sashing, but with inserted cornerstones.  The purpose of sashing is that it focuses attention on individual blocks.  If the same fabric is used in the sashing as is used in the background, it makes the blocks ‘float’. Different fabric accentuates the blocks and lifts the quilt.  With no sashing, there is no focus and the blocks merge together.  The more ‘plain’ areas in a quilt, the more quilting is required.  Never overwhelm a quilt with too many sashings or large borders. No more than ¼ or 1/3 of any quilt should be sashing and borders combined.

Next month, Dena Crain will speak about a different method of quilting, one that involves no piecing!  The March program is yet to be organised.

The AGM takes place in April, and we elect new officers then. Think now about whether you can serve as an officer, or if you believe someone else would do the job well. We need nominations soon!

Next meeting: February 18


Patty welcomed back the members after the summer break. Quite a few ladies had their birthdays in August and they were joined by those celebrating theirs in September for a rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’. The visitors were then introduced.

Gretchen collected the twenty-three Challenge Quilts. The remainder of the quilts that have not been finished will hopefully be submitted before too long.  Since the appliqué was an elephant, Gretchen is interested in encouraging members to donate their work for sale in aid of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. During the coffee break Guild members had the opportunity to view and vote for the Challenge Quilt of their choice. The winners were:  1st Prize:  Majeet, 2nd Prize: Brij and joint 3rd Prize: Jasvinder and Raghbir.

The artwork for the Kenya Quilt Guild 2016 calendar is not yet complete. The calendars should be ready for sale in the near future and ladies were positive that sales would be good this year. The money derived from the calendars will help pay for the hall rental for the 2017 Kenya Quilt Guild Exhibition at the Sarit Centre.

Gretchen reported on our charity projects. Dream Children’s Home now has no fewer than sixty-nine children. They have a vehicle and a garage, but still are in need of support. FreMo, the small maternity centre, charges KES 5,000/- per birth, but they are pressed for financial support. We have recently donated two blood pressure machines to the organisation. They are in need of baby clothes and nappies. There were embroidery threads for sale, proceeds to go to Christine Kibuka to help her purchase fabrics and to the maternity hospital.

Gill spoke about education. Unfortunately, one of our prospective overseas teachers has had to decline, however Sarah Brewin will teach in November. We had good positive feedback on her suggestion of machine appliqué of her animal shoes. Gill’s beginners’ classes resume in early October.

Gill has also received an invitation from South Africa’s SANQG for those interested in taking an online course to become a certified quilting teacher. Any applicant must make the designated sample block and pay Rand 1500. This is a twleve-month course which begins in February/March. Anyone interested, please contact Gill.

After coffee, Veena Sennik won the door prize, then Show and Tell commenced. Veena had a Ricki Timms four-by-four.  Anne Lyon finished her quilt top made from the June BOM.  Suzanne Waithaka made a small wallhanging from an oil painting the she had repurposed.  Nandan Shah showed her chevrons and Gretchen Mwaura made a pink wallhanging for her great granddaughter.  She also made a pillow case from the machine quilting that she learned from Charu.  Nirmal Jeet showed two pieces, a baby quilt with teddy bears and a sampler.  Summer in the Park, tube quilt technique, was Jasmine Morelli’s share.  Lakhbir Virdee had a bright and colourful crazy 8’s quilt. From a pattern in one of the library books, Raji Syan made a lovely quilt and she also had a table runner that was machine appliquéd. Jasvinder Phull had table mats and a chop block quilt, along with a mystery quilt that Jana Mead introduced.

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Dr. Pauline Macaulay from the UK spoke to us about the Talking Quilts Oral History project, an undertaking by The Quilter’s Guild of the British Isles. Talking Quilts was inspired by a similar project in the USA, QSOS (Quilters Save Our Stories), part of the Alliance for American Quilts.

Pauline and her committee record stories of quilts. The members preserve, record and share people’s stories to be archived.  The project also recognises quilt trends.  Pauline is a volunteer who goes around the UK and interviews people who make quilts and writes their stories.  “Talking Quilts” is linked with the “Fine Cell Work” project, a charity that teaches prisoners quilting as a form of rehabilitation, as ‘paid, skilled, creative needlework to foster hope, discipline and self esteem.”  Pauline shared a lovely story of Sylvester, a Polish prisoner from Wansworth Prison who loves quilting and how it helped him with prison life.  She shared another heartfelt story of a mother who lost her daughter, aged 15, to a motor accident.  She used all of her daughter’s clothing to make a beautiful quilt which was therapy for dealing with her loss.

The Kenya Quilt Guild meets next on October 15. If you are a quilter living in or visiting Nairobi at that time, we invite you to join us!


After welcoming our guests and new members to the meeting, our Chairperson Patty Arensen asked the ladies that have their birthday in February to stand.  They all received a round of applause.

Suzanne Waithaka was introduced to the meeting as the new Assistant Editor for Snippets and all contributors past and present were thanked. Suzanne requested that any photos taken during the meeting be sent to her for reformatting and then she will in turn forward them so they can be posted on the website.

The 2014 Exhibition Committee had met and the dates of 3rd – 5th October were confirmed for the Sarit Centre.  We will be publishing a calendar in conjunction with the KEG, proceeds to help with the funding of the hall.  Members are asked to bring along a photograph of one of their quilting projects, then in May the members will vote on the photos.  A short list of most popular photos will be taken to the photographer and he/she will select seven quilts to be printed on the calendar.  The quilts must be available for the professional photographer.

There was a competition during the 2013 Exhibition and a prize offered by Vice-Chairperson Charu Patel for the person who sold the most raffle books.  The beaded necklace wall hanging was presented to Neela Shah, the worthy winner!

The last edition of the Mystery Quilt was included in Snippets.  Quilts should be ready by the July meeting, where they will be voted upon by members and a prize presented.  These quilts will be displayed in a special area in the Exhibition.

The UFO afternoon will continue on from the meeting where members were invited to come and sew.

Ragbir Syan’s Twisted Table Runner class will be held on Thursday, 27th February.  Members who wished to sign up for the class were asked to pay in full to reserve a place.

Librarian Raji Syan asked members for suggestions for library books by the first week in March.  Raji has an up-to-date catalogue of library books for perusal.  No one was particularly interested in starting a magazine subscription.

The Guild workshop should be operational by Easter.  Raji Syan and Poley Bhamra will start up the workshop making small kits for sale during the Exhibition.

Next month, Estelle will speak about The Tentmakers of Cairo (see alsohttp://www.jennybowker.com/tentmakers/), and and she will have a few pieces of their work to share with us.  In April we will have our AGM and Membership Officer Kundan Pattni will have a presentation too.

Kundan is still collecting membership fees.  It is very important that each member completes a form so we have current email addresses.

The Show and Tell was varied this month.  April Webb shared her baby quilt that she made from a jelly roll and her intricate appliqué piece. Suzanne Waithaka made a bag from 5” squares and Carol Davey shared a quilt made by her night guard using octagonal pieces.  Gill Rebelo brought along needlework that she purchased in S.E. Asia which included small bags, tablemats and coasters.  She also shared a book on indigo fabric with us.  Jasbir Jabbal finished her sampler quilt and Maureen Dougherty had her pillows made from the embroidery blocks that Bev Rebelo brought from Zimbabwe.  Indu Shah also had a sampler quilt and Jasvinder Phull made an iPad cover. Pauline Mang’ana had a large quilt with appliqué houses and trees and Patty Arensen shared her baby quilt with us. Dorothy Stockell and Karen Crumpacker finished their “Lala Salama” (sleep well in Kiswahili) quilts.

An announcement was made that Buttons and Bows at Yaya Centre has a 20% off sale until the end of the month!

Petrina Spencer-Walker, qualified physiotherapist, gave us a presentation and talk about “Quilting and its Problems”.  She demonstrated the correct sitting position at the sewing machine and how to avoid getting headaches, tight shoulders, lower back pain, and hand discomfort amongst other problems.  She explained how sitting badly can cause a multitude of harms to the body and suggested taking breaks every 40 minutes or so. She took questions at the end of her talk and everyone found the information very valuable.

 


Our visitors, Bev, Marta, Abigail, Gaudencia, and Veronica were given a warm welcome to our meeting. We are happy to see the return of Estelle, an old member who has been away for 8 years!

Patty expressed her sorrow at recent events which happened at Westgate shopping mall. She felt that it would be nice for the KQG to acknowledge the wonderful work carried out by the Kenya Red Cross during this awful tragedy. Members were asked to sign up to make a red and white ‘Peace’ wall hanging for them and we received a good response.

New library books have been purchased in UK and are expected to arrive soon–be on the look out!

Gill Rebelo is waiting for feedback from Turkey about the possibility of individuals entering quilts into their 2014 show.

Bev Rebelo’s recent classes were excellent!  Gill was disappointed that the response from members was not as good as before. Bev’s visit did not coincide with a Guild meeting at the beginning so perhaps members were unaware of the wonderful learning opportunities to be had from her classes. Do not miss out next time!

Members were asked what skills they would like to learn. One member suggested ‘piecing curves’. If you want to learn a patchwork skill, LET US KNOW! Call or email any of the Executive Committee members.

THURSDAY 7TH NOVEMBER, 09.30 0NWARDS, SIMBA UNION. Put this in your diaries everyone! It is UFO day! Bring your unfinished projects and we will help you finish them. No quilt is a lost quilt! Bring a vegetarian (requirement of the Sikh Union) packed lunch.

WEDNESDAY 11TH DECEMBER IS THE CHRISTMAS LUNCH! Come along and have fun! More details later…..

Show and Tell was, as always, a wonderful array of our members work!

Gill explained the ‘Mystery Quilt’ project to us. It is open to all members at all skill levels. Instructions are in ‘Snippets’ from this month onwards.

Bev Rebelo showed us some of her fantastic quilts. I think this made many members wish they had signed up for her classes! She went on to demonstrate the use of photography and the free computer program called ‘GIMP’ where photographs can be manipulated and printed onto fabric. It was a very inspiring talk.

Finally, our door prize was won by Marcia!

Next regular meeting will be held on Thursday, November 21, at the Sikh Union off Forest Road in Nairobi.


The June meeting was a very interesting one, starting with our officers arriving to set up only to discover we had been moved out of our usual meeting hall to an upstairs room.  Although that caused a small flurry of activity, things quickly settled down and the meeting proceeded without further interruption.

We had a somewhat unusually large turn-out of guests and visitors, and Chairperson Neela Shah welcomed everyone, including one or two new members.  Sadly, she then called for a moment of silence in memory of our recently deceased friend, Rowena Buxton.  The last few weeks have been a sad time for the Guild as we have each had to accept this most unfortunate loss.

Deanna Gaudaur has issued an invitation to our members to visit her studio at Kijabe for a demonstration of her long-arm quilting system.  Of course, this necessitates a social outing complete with car-pooling and a sign-up sheet to control who will bring what dishes for lunch.  When our members cook, the eating is top-notch, so if you’re a KQG member or guest, you won’t want to miss out.  Date for the event is August 1, and it’s not too late to join in on the fun!

Sarah Brewin will be back with us later in the year, so everyone is encouraged to work on their African quilts to send with her for exhibition at the Rhododendron Needlework Quilters Guild in Boston.  From there, the quilts will be forwarded to Canada where they will be shown during the “Out of Africa 2013” exhibition to be held at the London Hilton Hotel in Ontario, Canada, June 11-15, 2013.

The International Quilt Convention Africa 2012 is fast approaching, scheduled to run July 27-29 in Johannesburg. Members are urged to make airline, accommodation, workshop and social function reservations immediately so as not to miss out on the opportunity to participate in this historic and fun-filled event:  the first ever professionally organized quilt festival on the entire continent of Africa!

Gill Rebelo also encouraged any of our members willing to do so to participate in Village Market’s Jean-ius fashion design competition.  Details about that can be found on the Village Market Facebook Page.

Show and Tell photos are below:

Our guest speaker was textile artist Sophie Standing, whose work is much in demand.  Sophie produces images of African wildlife and domestic animals on cotton canvas by applying raw edge appliqué of a wide range of printed cotton and other fabrics, followed by machine stitching.  She described something of the processes she goes through from initial sketch to finished piece.  She stretches her completed pieces on stretcher frames, ready for decorative framing.  Sophie’s work has been so successfully received by Kenyans and international visitors that she has commissions booked for the next two years!  Well done, Sophie; we all greatly admire your work!

Sophie Standing

Sophie Standing, Textile Artist

Sophie Standing, Textile Artist

Sophie Standing, Textile Artist

Sophie Standing, Textile Artist

The July meeting will be a children’s quilt day!  All attendees are invited to bring any children they know who might like to learn about patchwork quilting plus 1 dozen cupcakes, and be prepared to teach and learn with the young people.


The notes below, about patchwork quilt batting, were given to us to publish by Deanna Gaudaur, a member of the Kenya Quilt Guild.  At the March 2012 meeting, Deanna presented a lecture based on these notes, and most generally offered to share them with us here.  Thank you, Deanna!

What is batting/wadding? It is the middle of your quilt sandwich, or the insulating layer that provides warmth. It also adds dimension/thickness.

How is it held together?

  • Bonded: similar to glue, using starch or resin, some will dissipate with water so you might not be able to preshrink them.
  • Scrim: A gauze, a loosely woven fabric sometimes used to stabilize the fibers
  • Needle punched: Fibers are loosely felted together by a process involving many needles. It is more stable but is harder to needle as it is quite firm. More stability for wall hangings means your quilts don’t droop so much. A word here about needle punched batts: put the batting on the quilt with the needle holes the same way you will quilt.

Each type of batting has a long list of pros and cons.  There is no “right” choice for every quilt and it will take some research to find the best one for your project. But how many hours and how much money have you invested into your quilt? Let’s not just put it together with any old batt!

Before we talk about the types of batting and which one you should use, there is a list of questions which can be asked about each project:

 

  • What am I making? A baby quilt requiring frequent washing will require a different choice than a large bed quilt. A table runner or placemats will need to be washed frequently and an art quilt will never come near water but might need dry-cleaning.
  • How will I be finishing it? Will it be tied, hand quilted or machine quilted?
  • What kind of look do I want? Puffy? Flat? Highly defined?  Do I want to see the actual quilting stitch line, or do I want the texture and dimension that quilting creates? You might want a soft cuddly bed quilt but more stiffness for a quilted carry-all.
  • How warm should it be, or do I want it to breathe?
  • Will shrinkage matter? Is the quilt’s finished size important? Quilting causes up to 5% shrinkage, then if you wash and it shrinks another 1-4% due to your batting choice, you might be surprised at how small it ends up!
  • Do I want this quilt to feel weighty or light?
  • What price can I afford to pay?
  • What fiber will be best?
    • Cotton: Feels like a thick flannel. It’s a good option for machine quilting because it doesn’t slip around. Generally it must be quilted closely. Cotton shrinks up to 4%, softening the appearance of the quilt and giving it a comfortable look. It can be sometimes prewashed/shrunk if you don’t like that feature. It is low loft, so doesn’t provide much definition to the quilting.
    • Polyester: Less expensive, readily available in Nairobi, and is better for hand-quilting (if it is low loft) because it doesn’t need to be quilted so closely. High loft is best for comforter-like quilts, minimal quilting, or tying. It also holds it shape better, even when washed repeatedly. It resists mold and mildew as well. But negative sides can be the bearding that can occur, particularly if you use a lesser quality fabric or a dull needle. It is slippery when machine quilting, so take care to baste well. It also doesn’t breath well, so people can overheat. But, it can shift, especially when hanging. That being said, the majority of my quilts are done with polyester and my own son wanted the “poofiness”of a poly batt, not the drape of cotton.
    • Bamboo: When I quilted professionally for the year I was in Canada, 90% of my quilting was done on this type of batt. It is very soft/drapeable and easy to use, either by machine or by hand. They are very washable and because the fibers are longer the quilting distance will be greater than in a cotton batt. We think of them as being very organic and environmental because bamboo is a renewable resource, especially when we hear about the world-wide shortage of cotton. However, most bamboo bats are only 50% bamboo and the process by which the bamboo is made into fibers suitable for using is very labour and energy intensive, negating some of the positive image.  Learn more at O Ecotextiles.
    • 80 % Cotton, 20% polyester blends:  This is Hobbs’ best selling quilt batt. I like the lightness of this product, rather than the heaviness of pure cotton. Also it is thin, it has a bit more loft due to the polyester. It is available in Nairobi at The Woman Shop.
    • Other options: Flannel–prewash unless you want shrinkage; old blankets, quilts or used quilt batts; or even polyurethane or rubber foam–available from Nakumatt in the mattress section.  This is ideal for a stiffer project, like placemats, table runners or bags.

Find a helpful batting chart on The Curious Quilter blog.

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